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Online Certificate of Graduate Study in Postsecondary Developmental Literacy and Language Instruction

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The Certificate of Graduate Study in Postsecondary Developmental Literacy and Language Instruction is intended to prepare current and future college education professionals to serve a diverse group of students in a variety of postsecondary literacy contexts, including learning assistance programs and developmental/transitional programs in both community colleges and universities.

The Certificate promotes mastery in five key areas related to postsecondary literacy instruction: theory, practice, assessment, research, and professional development. Those completing the Certificate will be equipped to understand and critically analyze the historical context of developmental literacy instruction; recognize the social, cultural, linguistic, and academic diversity of students enrolled in developmental literacy coursework; design and implement appropriate and effective evidence-based instruction; and participate professionally in the field of postsecondary developmental literacy.

Required Core Courses (12 credits)

LTRE 519 (3 credits)—Teaching Postsecondary Reading OR LTRE 719 (3 credits)—Principles and Methods of Teaching Postsecondary Reading

LTRE 512 (3 credits)—Disciplinary Reading Instruction at the Postsecondary Level

LTRE 521 (3 credits)—Postsecondary Reading Assessment

LTRE 518 (3 credits)—Curriculum and Program-Level Design in Postsecondary Reading

Elective Course (3 credits)

The fifth course is a self-selected elective from a listing of professional-development topics, including Adult Literacy, Adult English Language Learning, and Student Development in Higher Education.

Faculty

Questions?

For more information about the program, contact Jodi Lampi at (815) 753-8486 or jlampi@niu.edu
Jodi Lampi

Jodi P. Lampi is an Assistant Professor of Postsecondary Literacy at NIU. She earned her doctorate in Developmental Education Literacy from Texas State University, becoming the first in the nation to earn a Ph.D. in developmental education. Her teaching background includes postsecondary literacy instruction in developmental education domains as well as composition instruction for first- and second-year students, in Michigan, Texas, and Illinois, and within community college and university settings. In addition, she has taught abroad at an International Baccalaureate high school in Oulu, Finland. Her research interests focus around postsecondary students’ conceptualizations of literacy, expert and novice practices within the disciplines, and policy mandates on curricular and program structures and their effects on student outcomes.

Norm Stahl

Norman A. Stahl is Professor Emeritus and past Chairperson of Literacy Education at NIU. Over the years, his scholarship has focused on postsecondary reading and learning strategy instruction via texts, content analyses, instructional reviews, empirical research, commentaries, organizational histories, and methodological pieces on history and oral history. He has received honors for his scholarship and service from the National Association for Developmental Education, the College Reading and Learning Association, the College Literacy and Learning Special Interest Group of the International Reading Association, the Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers, and the Literacy Research Association. He served as President of the following associations: the Literacy Research Association, the Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers, the History of Reading Special Interest Group of the International Reading Association, the College Reading and Learning Association, and the Chair of the American Reading Forum. He is a national Fellow of the Council of Learning Assistance and Developmental Education Associations.

Concetta A. Williams is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Postsecondary Literacy at NIU.  She earned her doctorate in literacy education with a focus on postsecondary literacy from Northern Illinois University, and she also holds an M.A. degree in Literature and an M.A.T.  degree in Secondary English Education. Her experience includes teaching at the primary, secondary, and postsecondary levels, and she has spent much of her teaching career in urban settings.  Her research focuses on broadening the definition of literacy in an effort to better understand perceptions of literate behavior in academic settings, reconceptualizing literacy as a social practice, using literacy as means of developing social capital, and working with diverse student populations (first-year, first-generation).